Today’s winning 5-second tactics

baku

The examples presented here are from the first round of the World Cup taking place in Baku. Solutions at the end. Goodluck!

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gm  Kempinski, Robert

6

gm  Nguyen, Ngoc Truong Son

Position after 30 moves. Black has been suffering since the opening, and the most that can be said of his game is that atleast he has maintained material equality.  This won’t last much longer…

WHITE TO PLAY AND CRUSH!

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gm  Ortiz Suarez, Isan Reynaldo

5

gm  Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime

Position after 28 moves.  Black had just played 28…Bc8, attacking the White Rook. It is always instructive to see how this young Frenchman exploits his advantage.  Here, besides the extra pawn, White has dominating pieces.  Surely there must be a way to finish Black off quickly…

WHITE TO PLAY AND CRUSH!

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gm  Idani, Pouya

4

gm  Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar

Position after 14 moves.  I like this example! The position hides some interesting tactics.  At first sight, with Black’s Knight securely anchored on e4, one would think that little bad can happen to Black. 

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Mamedyarov looking quite confident before the game starts.  Photo courtesy of tournament organizer.

But the secret of the position is to realize that while Black has spent valuable time to do this, he has neglected to move his Rooks into the centre…

HOW DOES WHITE GET THE UPPER HAND?

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gm  Svidler, Peter

3

gm  Can, Emre

Position after 30 moves.  Black has the better pawn structure and therefore must stand better.  Espectially not wanting to get ground down by the Russian’s famous positional mastery, White found a clever tactical idea:

31. Bxd5!?

3b

The idea is that after 31…cxd5 32.Nxd5 Qf7 33.Nxe7 Rxe7 34.Re1! Bc6 35.Rxe7 Nxe7 36.Qe3! and the Rook and pawns are better than the two pieces as Black can not easily coordinate them. Could it be that Svidler overlooked White’s last move?

HOW DOES BLACK KEEP THE ADVANTAGE?

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gm Kramnik,Vladimir

2

wgm  Cori T., Deysi

Position before Black’s 17th move.  White has played the opening too aggresively against the former world champion and now finds herself in deep trouble. 

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Kramnik can get a clear advantage with 17…b4!?, though after 18.Nxd5 Qe6 19.e4 Nxe4 20.Qa4+!? White sould still have some swindling chances. One of the marks of an extra-class player is never giving one’s opponent undeserved chances.

BLACK TO PLAY AND CRUSH!

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MOST BIZARRE MOVE OF THE ROUND?!

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im  Adu, Oladapo  (2241)

1

gm  Topalov,V

Position after White’s 17th move (17.h4)  Black has misplayed the opening and now finds all of his pieces (or almost all) on the back rank.  A miserable position for Black!  BUT did Black lose heart and resign himself to passive defence?  NO  WAY!!

17…g5!!!

1b

The triple exclam is not for the chess-merits of the move (does it have any point?) but for the courage and spirit of Adu in trying to make a fight of it.

chances

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FIDE World Cup Baku 2015.9.11 Nguyen, Ngoc Truong Son–Kempinski, Robert: 31.Rxd5! 1-0

FIDE World Cup Baku 2015.9.11 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime–Ortiz Suarez, Isan Reynaldo: 29.Bxf7+ Rxf7 30.Nd5 Bxf2+ ( 30…Qxc4 31.Rxb6 is simple enough ) 31.Qxf2 Qd8 ( 31…Qxc4 32.Rc6! is crushing ) ( 31…Rxf2 32.Nxc7 is an easy win with the passed b-pawn ) 32.Qb6 Qh4 33.Ra8 Rf8 34.Qxd6 Qf2+ 35.Kh2 1-0

FIDE World Cup Baku 2015.9.11 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar–Idani, Pouya: 15.Nxe4! fxe4 (worse is 15…dxe4 16.Bc4+ Kh8 17.Nxd7 Qxd7 18.dxc5 bxc5 19.Qc3 Rf6 20.Qxf6! etc) 16.Bxe4!! dxe4 (worse is 16…Nxe5 17.dxe5 Bxe5 18.Rxd5!) 17.Nxd7 Qxd7 (worth considering is 17…Rf5 18.dxc5 bxc5 19.Qc4+ Kh8 20.Rxd6 Qxd6 21.Nxc5 though White is better) 18.dxc5 Bxh2+ ( 18…bxc5 19.Be5 Rf6 20.Bxf6 gxf6 21.Qxc5 ) 19.Kxh2 Qc7+ 20.Kg1 Rac8 21.Qc4+ Rf7 22.cxb6 Qxb6 23.Qa4 Rcf8 24.Rd7 Rxd7 25.Qxd7 Rf7 26.Qe8+ Rf8 27.Qa4 a6 28.Qc4+ Rf7 29.Rd1 Qc7 30.Qe6 Qe7 31.Ba3 1-0

FIDE World Cup Baku 2015.9.11 Can, Emre–Svidler, Peter:  31…Nxd4!! 32.Bg2? (Ofcourse not 32.Qxd4 Re1+; Relatively best is 32.Qf4!? Qxf4 33.gxf4 c5 with Black having the upper hand;  34.Bxb7?? Bg4!) 32…Nb3!  White must have completely overlooked this move. The game does not last long now: 33.Ne4 Nxd2 34.Nxf6 Kxf6 0-1

FIDE World Cup Baku 2015.9.11 Cori T., Deysi–Kramnik, Vladimir: 17…d4! The idea is that if now 18.Nxd4 b4! and the Knight can not move because of …Be4! snaring the Queen!The game continued 18.exd4 (what else?) 18…Bxf3 19.dxc5 Bxd1 20.Qxd1 Rxc5 and Black won easily. White resigned on the 31st move.

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