Today’s winning 5-second tactics

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“Everything has to come to an end, sometime.”

― L. Frank Baum, The Marvelous Land of Oz

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gm  Pruijssers,R

3

gm  Bok,B

ch-NED  Amsterdam  2015.7.10  Position after White’s 40th move (40.Re8)  White is threatening Qg8+ followed by Re6+, driving the Black monarch into the open.  Black has reasonable chances of surviving if he can avoid this happening, and analysis after the game demonstrated that he must try 40…Re5! 41.Rd8 Qc6 42.Qf4 Qe4 43.Qxe4+ Rxe4 44.Rd1 Rb4 45.Rb1 Rb3 etc.  INSTEAD, Black thought he had another move, just as useful…

40…Qc4(?)

3b

Stopping both Qg8+ and Re6.  Curiously, Black now loses…

WHITE TO PLAY AND WIN!

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im  Panjwani,Raja

1

gm  Sambuev,B

Canadian Ch  Guelph 2015.7.12  Position after 23 moves.  A sharp game that has seen both players taking enormous risks, and true to style, Sambuev could not resist to start a sacrificial attack when it was not necessary. But fortune favours the brave…and a slight imprecision in the defence by Raja gives Sambuev the opportunity to score a key point.

WHITE TO PLAY AND CRUSH!

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Song, Guannan Terry  (1988)

2

Wan,Kevin (2196)

Position after White’s 27th move (27.Qf5)  A sharp position and an interesting game up to now. Black has a reasonable game with his Rooks on the 7th rank, completely neutralizing White’s passed a-pawn.  Infact, neither side can do anything! The game, with best play on both sides, should end in a perpetual check: 27…g6! (Forcing the White Queen to move) 28.Qf6 ( 28.Qxg5? Rxf2 is soon mate ) 28…Qe3!! (Threatening to draw with 29…Qg3+!!) 29.Qxf7+!  Nothing better 29… Kxf7 30.fxe3+ Kg7 31.Rfb1 when Black gives a perpetual check.

INSTEAD, probably too much in a rush to notice the difference, Black played:

27…Qe3(?)

2c

28.Qxc2!

2d

Ooops!  Now the reason for preparing the …Qe3 move with …g6 first!  Black played on a few more moves before throwing in the towel.

7df5aaf662124a2a551ed5d378a48125

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ch-NED  Amsterdam  2015.7.10 Bok,B–Pruijssers,R:   41.Rd8!! ( 41.Qh8+? Kg6 ) ( 41.Re7? Rg5! ) Re5 ( 41…Rc6 42.Qf5+ Rg6 43.Rd6 ) 42.Qh8+ Kg6 43.Rd6+ Kh5 44.g4+ Kh4 45.Rxh6+ Kg5 46.Qxg7+ Kf4 47.Qf6+ Ke4 48.Qc6+ Qxc6 49.Rxc6 Rb5 50.Re6+ Kf4 51.Rf6+ Ke4 52.Rf2 Rb3 53.g5 Ke5 54.h4 Ke6 55.g6 Rb8 56.Kg3 Ra8 57.h5 Rb8 58.g7 1-0

Canadian Ch  Guelph 2015.7.12  Sambuev, Bator–Panjwani, Raja: 24.Nxh7!!  Nicely calculated. Black’s open King position is the reason for his downfall. 24…Bxh2+ 25.Qxh2 Rxh7 ( 25…Rd7 26.Rd3 Qc7 27.Qxc7 Rxc7 28.Nxf8 ) 26.Qg3+! Kf7 27.Rd6!! Qe4 28.Rf6+ Ke8 29.Qb8+ 1-0

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